Disciplines

Precision events Rifle and musket individual and team events

No 1 Miquelet – Individual O and R – Teams: No 9 Gustav Adolph (O) and No 31 Halikko (R)
A) Firearm: Military smooth bore flintlock musket
B) Sights: Original pattern sights. No rear sight
C) Target: MLAIC C200 metres rifle target
D) Position: Standing
E) Distance: 50 metres
F) Bullet: Round ball only
G) Cleaning: Not permitted
H) Funnel: Short tube

No 2 Maximilian – Individual O and R – Teams: No 26 Wedgnock (O) and No 29 Lucca (R)
A) Firearm: Free flintlock rifle, any calibre
B) Sights: Contemporary sights, including original style reproduction sights
C) Target: MLAIC C50 metres pistol target
D) Position: Prone
E) Distance: 100 metres
F) Bullet: Round ball only
G) Cleaning: Permitted
H) Funnel: Permitted

No 3 Minie – Individual O and R – Teams: No 10 Pauly (O) and No 32 Magenta (R)
A) Firearm: Military percussion rifle over 13.5 mm (.5315″) bore
B) Sights: Original pattern sights
C) Target: MLAIC C50 metres pistol target
D) Position: Prone
E) Distance: 100 metres
F) Bullet: Original style bullets associated with that military rifle.
G) Cleaning: Not permitted
H) Funnel: Short tube

No 4 Whitworth – Individual O and R – Team No 20 Rigby (O and/or R Open)
A) Firearm: Free percussion rifles (not qualifying for No 3 Minie)
B) Sights: Contemporary sights, including original style reproduction sights. Aperture sights (Front and rear permitted) if consistent with the period.
C) Target: MLAIC C50 metres pistol target
D) Position: Prone
E) Distance: 100 metres
F) Bullet: Round ball or any type of elongated bullet
G) Cleaning: Permitted
H) Funnel: Permitted

No 8 Walkyrie – Ladies Individual O and R – Team No 17 Amazons (O and/or R Open)
A) Firearm: Free or military percussion rifles
B) Sights: According to Free or Military rifle rules
C) Target: MLAIC C50 metres pistol target
D) Position: Prone
E) Distance: 100 metres
F) Bullet: Round ball or any type of elongated bullet
G) Cleaning: Permitted
H) Funnel: Permitted

No 14 Tanegashima – Individual O and R – Teams: No 19 Nagashino (O and/or R Open and Team No 27 Nobunaga (O)
A) Firearm: Cheek stock smooth bore matchlock muskets of any calibre in original class. Free smooth bore matchlock muskets of any calibre in reproduction class
B) Sights: Contemporary sights including original style reproduction sights
C) Target: MLAIC C200 metres rifle target.
D) Position: Standing
E) Distance: 50 metres
F) Bullet: Round ball only
G) Cleaning: Permitted
H) Funnel: Permitted

No 15 Vetterli – Individual O and R – Team No 24 Pforzheim (O and/or R Open)
A) Firearm: Any matchlock or flintlock musket; any flintlock or percussion rifle
B) Sights: According to the rules for each class
C) Target: MLAIC C50 metres pistol target
D) Position: Standing
E) Distance: 50 metres
F) Bullet: Round ball or any type of elongated bullet
G) Cleaning: Permitted
H) Funnel: Permitted

No 16 Hizadai – Individual O and R – Team No 43 Hibuta (O) and No 44 Hinowa (R)
A) Firearm: Cheek stock smooth bore matchlock muskets of any calibre in original class. Free smooth bore matchlock muskets of any calibre in reproduction class.
B) Sights: Contemporary sights including original style reproduction sights.
C) Target: MLAIC C200 metres rifle target.
D) Position: Kneeling.
E) Distance: 50 metres.
F) Bullet: Round ball only
G) Cleaning: Permitted
H) Funnel: Permitted

No 36 Pennsylvania – Individual O and R – Team No 42 Kossuth (O and/or R Open)
A) Firearm: Free flintlock rifle, any calibre
B) Sights: Contemporary sights, including original style reproduction sights
C) Target: MLAIC C50 metres pistol target
D) Position: Standing
E) Distance: 50 metres
F) Bullet: Round ball only
G) Cleaning: Permitted
H) Funnel: Permitted

No 37 Lamarmora – Individual O and R – Team No 40 Enfield (O and/or R Open)
A) Firearm: Military percussion rifle over 13.5 mm (.5315″) bore
B) Sights: Original pattern sights (with minor alterations permitted)
C) Target: MLAIC C50 metres pistol target
D) Position: Standing
E) Distance: 50 metres.
F) Bullet: Original style bullets associated with that military rifle.
G) Cleaning: Not permitted
H) Funnel: Short tube

A. Rifle Team Events

No 9 – Gustav Adolph: Teams of 3: No 1 Miquelet rules (O)
No 10 – Pauly: Teams of 3: No 3 Minie rules (O)
No 11 – Versailles: Aggregate of Teams: Nos. 9 and No 10
No 17 – Amazons: Teams of 3: No 8 Walkyrie rules (O and/or R Open)
No 19 – Nagashino: Teams of 3: No 14 Tanegashima rules (O and/or R Open)
No 20 – Rigby: Teams of 3: No 4 Whitworth rules (O and/or R Open)
No 24 – Pforzheim: Teams of 3: No 15 Vetterli rules (O and/or R Open)
No 26 – Wedgnock: Teams of 3: No 2 Maximilian rules (O)
No 27 – Nobunaga: Teams of 3: No 14 Tanegashima rules (O)
No 29 – Lucca: Teams of 3 No 2 Maximilian rules (R)
No 31 – Halikko: Teams of 3 No 1 Miquelet rules (R)
No 32 – Magenta: Teams of 3 No 3 Minie rules (R)
No 40 – Enfield: Teams of 3 in No 37, Lamarmora (O and/or R Open)
No 42 – Kossuth: Teams of 3 No 36 Pennsylvania rules (O and/or R Open)
No 43 – Hibuta: Teams of 3 in No 16, Hizadai (O)
No 44 – Hinowa: Teams of 3 in No 16, Hizadai (R)

B. Pistol individual and team events

No 5 Cominazzo – Individual O and R – Team No 25 Wogdon (O and/or R Open)
A) Pistol: Free single shot smooth bore flintlock. Minimum bore diameter 11 mm (.433″)
B) Sights: Contemporary sights
C) Target: MLAIC C50 metre pistol target
D) Position: Standing
E) Distance: 25 metres
F) Bullet: Round ball only

No 6 Kuchenreuter – Individual O and R – Teams: No 18 Boutet (O) and No 33 Forsyth (R)
A) Pistol: Free single shot percussion pistol, rifled, any calibre
B) Sights: 19th century contemporary sights
C) Target: MLAIC C50 metre pistol target
D) Position: Standing
E) Distance: 25 metres
F) Bullet: Round ball only

No 7 Colt – Individual O – Team No 30 Adams (O)
A) Pistol: Free percussion revolvers, original only
B) Sights: Contemporary sights. Height of fore-sight unlimited but profile shall be of original style
C) Target: MLAIC C50 metre pistol target
D) Position: Standing
E) Distance: 25 metres
F) Bullet: Round ball or picket bullet

No 12 Mariette – Individual R – Team No 13 Peterlongo(R)
A) Pistol: Free percussion revolvers, reproductions only
B) Sights: Contemporary sights. Height of fore-sight unlimited but profile shall be of original style
C) Target: MLAIC C50 metre pistol target
D) Position: Standing
E) Distance: 25 metres
F) Bullet: Round ball or picket bullet

No 28 Tanzutsu – Individual O and R – Team No 39 Kunitomo (O and/or R Open)
A) Pistol: Free matchlock pistols, smooth bore, Japanese type, any calibre, European type, large bore as per originals.
B) Sights: Contemporary sights. Profile shall be of original style
C) Target: MLAIC C50 metre pistol target
D) Position: Standing
E) Distance: 25 metres
F) Bullet: Round ball only

No. 23 Donald Malson – Individual O or R
A) Pistol Free percussion revolvers, original or reproduction; shall be same as used by competitor in Mariette or Colt event
B) Sights: Contemporary sights. Height or foresight unlimited but profile shall be of original style
C) Target: MLAIC C50-meter pistol target
D) Position: Standing
E) Distance: 50 metres
F) Round ball or picket bullet

No 38 Remington – This unfired event will consist of the fired scores from either the Colt or the Mariette 25-meter and the Malson 50-meter revolver events. The same firearm shall be used in both elements of the event

Pistol Team Events
No 13 – Peterlongo: Teams of 3: No 12 Mariette rules (R)
No 18 – Boutet: Teams of 3: No 6 Kuchenreuter rules (O)
No 25 – Wogdon: Teams of 3: No 5 Cominazzo rules (O and/or R Open)
No 30 -Adams: Teams of 3: No 7 Colt rules (O)
No 33 – Forsyth: Teams of 3: No 6 Kuchenreuter rules (R)
No 39 – Kunitomo: Teams of 3 No 28 Tanzutsu rules (O and/or R Open)
No 41 – Egg: Teams of 3: No 5 Cominazzo rules (O)
No 45 – El Alamo

Clay target competitions

No. 21 Manton
Free flintlock firearms of any calibre – O and R. Total of 50 clay targets shot in two separate rounds (one in the morning and one in the afternoon of the same day) on different ranges where possible, of 25 clay targets over five stands within 60 minute relay.

No. 22 Lorenzoni
Free percussion firearms of any calibre – O and R. Total of 50 clay targets shot in two separate rounds, (one in the morning and one in the afternoon of the same day) on different ranges where possible of 25 clay targets over five stands within 60 minute relay.

No. 34 Hawker
Teams of three competitors from No. 21 – O and/or R Open

No. 35 Batesville
Teams of three competitors from No. 22 – O and/or R Open

Competition names and origins

Miquelet (Miguelete)
Early Spanish flintlock with external mainspring and of rugged and reliable construction. Used all around the Mediterranean.
Original Class Cup donated by the Federacion Nacional del Tiro Olimpico Espanol (1972)
Replica Class Cup donated by Archibugieri di Piemonte (1983)

Maximilian
Austrian Emperor (1459 – 1519), dedicated hunter and gun lover, said to be the first to use rifled firearms which would have been in matchlock form.
Original Class Cup donated by the Muzzle Loaders Association of Great Britain (1972)
Replica Class Cup donated by Cyrus Smith, USA (1987)

Minie
Claude-Etienne Minie, French Army Captain (1804 – 1879) who designed in 1849 the hollow-base expanding bullet to facilitate quick loading in rifled arms.
Original Class Cup donated by the Arquebusiers de France (1972)

Whitworth
Sir Joseph Whitworth, much celebrated 19th century mechanical engineer (1803 – 1887) who advanced the accuracy of engineering and developed a rifling system for long range shooting.
Original Class Cup donated by the Muzzle Loaders Association of Great Britain (1972)

Cominazzo
Famous family of barrel and gun makers from Gardone Val Trompia in Italy during the 16th and 17th centuries.
Original Class Cup donated by Archibugieri di Piemonte (1983)
Replica Class Cup donated by Badischer Sport Verband (1989)

Kuchenreuter
Famous family of gun makers from Regensburg, Germany, well known for their fine pistols (from 1626 to the present day)
Original Class Cup donated by the Deutsches Waffen Journal, Germany (1972)

Colt
Designer of the first successful percussion revolver to be manufactured on a large scale (from 1838 onwards)
Cup donated by Jim Briggs of the Nation Muzzle Loading Rifle Association of USA (1972)

Walkyrie
Warrior maidens from Scandinavian sagas.
Original Class Cup donated by the Deutsches Waffen Journal, Germany (1972)

Gustav Adolf
Gustav Adolf the Great (1594-1632) King of Sweden, first to introduce the use of paper cartridges as standard for his soldiers.
Cup donated by the Federation Francaise de Tir (1972)

Pauly
Swiss Artillery Officer (1766 – 1817) and designer of the first centre-fire obturating cartridge.
Cup donated by the Town of Versailles (1972)

Versailles
‘Grand Prix de Versailles’ – First International Muzzle Loaders Team Event, shot at Tir National de Versailles in May 1968. Cup donated by the Tir National de Versailles (1972)

Pennsylvania

An original state in the formation of the USA. Arms makers there during the 1700’s developed a distinctive long, full-stocked, flintlock rifle capable of high accuracy even at long distances

Mariette
Well known Belgium pepperbox pistol maker.
Cup donated by Deutscher Schutzenbund, Germany (1977)
2nd Cup donated by BPSU of South Africa.

Peterlongo
Famous Austrian gunmaker (1826 -1898) working through the transition from muzzle loading to cartridge arms. Specialised in sporting and target rifles but also made many pistols and revolvers. Trophy (plate) donated by Deutscher Schutzenbund, Germany (1974)

Tanegashima
Island in the south of Japan where the first matchlocks appeared in 1543. They were brought in by a Portuguese ship drifting during a cyclone. Within five months the local Daimyo had commissioned 600 replicas and a powder mill, ensuring the rapid adoption of the matchlock as a military weapon throughout Japan.
Original Class Trophy donated by the National Rifle Association of Japan
Replica Class Trophy donated by Cyrus Smith of USA (1981)

Vetterli
Freidrich Vetterli (1822 -1882), inventor of the famous 1869 thirteen shot Swiss Army repeater.
Original Class Trophy donated by the town of Zurich (1981)
Replica Class Cup donated by Archibugieri di Piemonte of Italy (1985)

Hizadai
Japanese kneeling position used in matchlock shooting and derived from the term used in the elaborate Samurai training courses. Original Class Trophy donated by the National Rifle Association of Japan

Amazons
Famous race of female warriors in Asia Minor who fought against Theseus, Achilles, Cyrus and Hercules.
Cup donated by the Federation Francaise de Tir

Boutet
Nicolas Boutet (1761 – 1833), Director of the Versailles Arms Factory, was Napoleon’s best gun maker. His many masterpieces were presentation arms for Kings, Marshals and Generals.
Cup donated by Gazette des Armes, France (1983)

Nagashino
Decisive battle for power in Japan (1575) where Nobunaga’s three thousand arquebusiers, with only one day’s training, held up a rate of fire of 6,000 shots a minute along an 1,800 metre front line, and destroyed the most powerful army of the day killing 10,000 out of 12,000 of their mounted Samurai.
Trophy (a splendid gold reproduction of an historical painting showing all the details of the battle) donated by the Town Council of Horai, in whose county lies the battlefield and the site of Nagashino castle. (1990)

Rigby
John Rigby, gun and rifle maker of Dublin, who specialised in superb sporting rifles and developed very accurate long range target rifles with which he entered long range matches (up to 1,000 yards) between 1862 and 1865. The firm of John Rigby still continues in business and produces beautiful sporting rifles.
Original Class Cup donated by the Muzzle Loaders Association of Great Britain.

Manton
Surname of the Brothers John and Joseph who worked independently and were two of the most famous of all English gun makers They produced superb fowling pieces, pistols and rifles.
Cup donated by the Shooting Sports Trust of Great Britain (1973)

Lorenzoni
Italian designer of early flintlock magazine repeaters, who lived in Florence from 1683 – 1733.
Original Class Cup donated by the Town of Codogno, Italy (1974)
Replica Class Cup donated by the Jaeger Vereinigung Pforzheim (1989)

Hawker
Lt Col Peter Hawker was a dedicated game shooter and wild-fowler, famous for his much reprinted book on the subject of shooting. He co-operated with Joseph Manton, the most prominent gun maker of the day, in the improvement of the sporting gun. Hawker’s double barrelled gun with which he bagged 14,000 head of game is now in the Birmingham Museum.
Cup donated by the Deutscher Schutzenbund (1989)

Pforzheim
Medieval town in Germany where the local shooting association, founded in 1450, held their first international championship in 1561, and the 13th MLAIC World Championship in 1989.
Trophy, given by the town of Pforzheim, was especially designed by Reinhold Krause (1990)

Wogdon
London gun maker working at the latter part of the 18th century who specialised in duelling pistols of the finest quality and style.
Trophy donated by the Muzzle Loaders Association of Great Britain (1996)

Wedgnock
The National Range Complex of the Muzzle Loaders Association of Great Britain and the venue for the 1996 and 1998 MLAIC World Championships. The Wedgnock Range is the largest muzzle loading range built and owned by muzzle loading shooters in the United Kingdom.
Cup donated by the Muzzle Loaders Association of Great Britain (1996)

Nobunaga
Oda Nobunaga, the victor at the Battle of Nagashino, who saw the military advantages of the matchlock musket over traditional samurai arms and employed arquebusiers in large numbers within his army to reach many conclusive victories.
Trophy donated by the National Rifle Association of Japan

Tanzutsu
TAN-ZUTSU is Japanese for short gun; TAN is the word for ‘short’ and ZUTSU, pronounced (TSUTSU) means ‘gun’. Tanzutsu – short gun
Trophy donated by Mr. Onoo president of MLA Japan (2004)

Adams
Robert Adams was an important figure from the British gun trade of the mid-19th century and the name will be familiar to anyone who has an interest in revolvers. Less well known is his work as a maker of sporting guns, though he played an active part in the London trade and was granted British, French, Belgian, Scottish and U.S. patents for sporting gun actions, boring and rifling machinery and ammunition. The first being his British patent 13257 of 1851 for his trigger cocking, solid frame revolver.
Trophy donated by the Muzzle Loaders Association of Great Britain (2004)

Lucca
Medieval walled city in Tuscany, Italy. Host of the 20th MLAIC World Championship in August 2002
Trophy donated by the Federation Francaise de Tir (2004)

Magenta
Town in Lombardia where, in 1859, the first relevant battle of the 2nd Italian Independence War was fought and won by the Piemontese Army and the French Allied Army over the Imperial Austrian Army.

Donald Malson
In May of 2007 the MLAIC lost not only a popular, knowledgeable and effective S.G. but also one of its all-time champion shooters, Donald “Bucky” Malson. Bucky paved the way for the admission of new MLAIC members such as Poland, the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic.

Egg
Durs Egg (1748–1831) was a Swiss-born British gunmaker, noted for his flintlock pistols and for his company’s production of the Ferguson rifle. Egg was apprenticed in Solothurn and Paris before establishing his own business in London in 1772. He was a contemporary of Joseph Manton and the uncle of Joseph Egg.
Trophy donated by the Muzzle Loaders Association of Great Britain (2004).

Enfield
Town in Middlesex to the North of London where the Enfield rifle was developed and manufactured. Manufacture of Enfield rifles continued at this site until after the Second World War.

Remington
Solid framed revolver as preferred by the majority of MLAIC revolver shooters. Manufactured by the Remington Arms Company in the USA

Halikko
Town in Finland, venue for the 2003 European Championships

Forsyth
The invention that made the percussion cap possible using the recently discovered fulminates was patented by the Rev. Alexander John Forsyth of Belhelvie, Aberdeenshire, Scotland in 1807.

Batesville
Town in Ohio, USA, venue for the 2004 World Championships

Pennsylvania
An original state in the formation of the USA. Arms makers there during the 1700’s developed a distinctive long, full-stocked, flintlock rifle capable of high accuracy even at long distances.

Lamarmora
Alfonso Lamarmora (1804-1878), General, War Minister and Chief of the Army Staff of Piemontese Expeditionary Corps during the Crimea War in 1855, he led the Italian Army in the 2nd (1859) and 3rd (1866) Independence War against Austria.

Kunitomo
Family of famous gun makers in the Edo period (1603 to 1868) in Japan.
THis was the largest gun producing district in Japan during the Siga prefecture.

Kossuth
Lajos Kossuth was a well-known freedom fighter and politician of the Hungarian revolution in 1848-1849 and later was a supporter of the national freedom movements of Europe.
Trophy presented by the Hungarian Muzzle Loading Shooting Association 2010

Hibuta
A Hibuta is a pancover. There is a Japanese proverb ” Open your Hibutas!” which means “Start to fight”
Trophy presented by the National Rifle Association Japan 2012

Hinowa
Derived from the Japanese expression for matchcord (hi meaning cord and nawa, fire).
Trophy presented by the Royal Dutch Shooting Association (KNSA) 2012

El Alamo
The Battle of the Alamo (February 23 – March 6, 1836) was a pivotal event in the Texas Revolution. Following a 13-day siege, Mexican troops under President General Antonio López de Santa Anna launched an assault on the Alamo Mission near San Antonio de Béxar (modern-day San Antonio, Texas, United States), killing all of the Texans defenders. Santa Anna’s cruelty during the battle inspired many Texans—both Texas settlers and adventurers from the United States—to join the Texian Army. Buoyed by a desire for revenge, the Texans defeated the Mexican Army at the Battle of San Jacinto, on April 21, 1836, ending the revolution
Trophy donated by the Belgium Shooting Federation (VSk) 2014

 

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